Silly essay topics

After students have read and understood the assigned topic, they can go on to the next step of the essay-writing process. This step does involve writing -- but not yet essay writing. In step two, students write an outline of their proposed essay. The outline should look something like this:
Congress According to Twain

1) Topic: The question or prompt rephrased in the student's own words. Rephrasing the prompt will help students understand the assignment and narrow and focus the topic of their essay. For example, "Mark Twain once said that all members of Congress are idiots."
2) Position: The student's position or opinion about the question or prompt. For example, "I see no reason to disagree."
Most writing assessments ask students to take a position. Students should be aware that, if the test directions ask them to take a position, they need to take one side of the issue and defend it, not consider and defend both sides of the issue.
3) Reasons: Three reasons the student has taken his or her stated position.
a) Reason 1: The most important reason. For example, "Congress has passed a number of bills without considering where the funding for those bills would come from."
i) Evidence: Example that demonstrates Reason 1. For example, "The Americans with Disabilities Act, the Clean Air Act, and the No Child Left Behind Act are just three examples of laws that were passed without considering how cities and states would pay to implement their mandates."
b) Reason 2: The second most important reason. For example, "Congress has passed a number of silly bills based on narrow political interests."
i) Evidence: Example that demonstrates Reason 2. "For example, federal laws have been passed making it a crime to imitate Smokey the Bear or transport wooden teeth across state lines."
c) Reason 3: The third most important reason. For example, "The members of Congress from my state are idiots."
i) Evidence: Example that demonstrates Reason 3. For example, "I met John Smith, a member of Congress from my state, and he had never heard of my hometown."

Like others have said already, this sounds like deflection. I’m a big fan of Chance but there’s always questionable things that if people turned on him, I’d completely understand. His grammy wins have always been suspect, that’s one. 2, the guy criticized Chicago’s governor, rather than the asinine mayor Rahm Emanuel who’s the chief architect of most of the problems in the area because he dad worked for the guy. He’s never once said a bad thing about Rahm and the guy is worse than the fat guy Christie. Then there’s also the story about him and his people threatening MTV about never working with them again unless they pulled a story that he thought was critical of his album (which wasn’t, but was rather a fair critique from someone who didn’t feel a connection to his material). Then the next thing you know he is on Wild’n’Out because they pulled the story (it’s on Medium now). So as much as I like him for his tone and civility and activism for the new generation, you can’t say his backlash is not warranted, because I didn’t even include these non-paying royalty allegations going around, plus others we might not know about, as the MTV story came in just this month after it happening around his album’s release.

Cancer creates a sense of urgency in the novel that wouldn’t exist otherwise. Because the characters are terminally ill, they view questions about life and its meaning very differently than their healthy counterparts, and their love is more meaningful to them than it might be to the average teenager. The reason is that death isn’t an abstraction to them. Hazel knows her cancer is terminal and that she will likely die before she becomes an adult. She also personally knows other kids who have died. Augustus has already had a girlfriend pass away from cancer. Because they know they likely have little time to live, they don’t have the luxury of figuring out what they believe about purpose and meaning over the course of several decades. The questions become immediate concerns that demand to be answered as soon as possible, whereas for healthy teenagers they’re more like philosophical questions. It also means that Hazel and Augustus realize their relationship may be the only significant one each has, even for Hazel who will likely live a few years, though perhaps not beyond that. As a result their love becomes that much more intense and meaningful.

Good questions. Supplementals are aimed at making sure you really like their school and are familiar with it. Start with the big things that you like about the school, rather than things like “I live just a mile away.” What is the FEEL of the school? What do they value? What makes them your favorite? Prove to them that you are itching to go there. In order to do this, you will need to do your research on what is different about that school. They don’t expect you to know everything about it, but you darn well better know some things that separate them from other schools.

Silly essay topics

silly essay topics

Good questions. Supplementals are aimed at making sure you really like their school and are familiar with it. Start with the big things that you like about the school, rather than things like “I live just a mile away.” What is the FEEL of the school? What do they value? What makes them your favorite? Prove to them that you are itching to go there. In order to do this, you will need to do your research on what is different about that school. They don’t expect you to know everything about it, but you darn well better know some things that separate them from other schools.

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